7/31/2007

Promise of Life

This is a 17-month-old baby boy’s hand, as he gets ready to play with his mother in Tehran. Can you see the promise of new experiences and adventures of life in it? The hand belongs to Shaya, who is Mana’s son. Mana is a young Iranian woman who chronicles her thoughts and experiences in her blog. I found her through Mrs. Shin’s blog, another educated Iranian mother and a writer, about whom I have written before. I go visit young mothers’ blogs all the time, not so much for the nostalgia, but somehow to reassure myself that the new generation of Iranian mothers is doing all the right things in raising their children, as that country’s future rests in their collective hands. When Iranian mothers teach their children social responsibility, love and respect for the environment, interest in reading as a cornerstone for understanding and dialogue, proper communication skills to have those dialogues, and respect for human rights, Iran will become a better place. I believe the future of every nation rests in the hands, hearts, and souls of its women as nurturers of that nation as its mothers, sisters, daughters, wives and friends. From what I see in Mana, Shin, and their other friends in Tehran, and what I see in people like Nimeh Shab in the US, I’m glad to report that we are in good hands and on our way. Sitting here imagining that future makes me so happy all of a sudden.

15 comments:

ا. ش said...

نازی عزیز حالا من هم یک مادر و یک بلاگ نویس دیگر به شما معرفی می کنم که فکر کنم از آن خوشتان بیاید. فردی است که نگاهش بسیار لطیف و زیباست
http://sahme-man-in-ast.blogfa.com/
شاید هم پیش از این او را می شناختید

مانا said...

نازی جون.هر کلمه ای از متن زیبای شما مثل لرزشی در قلبم بود.احساس افتخار می کنم که مادری مثل شما از من اینگونه یاد کرده و شاید ده بار دیگه این پست را بخوانم تا معنی هر کلمه اش را درک کنم .هرگز این نوشته را فراموش نخواهم کرد. مرسی از انرژی که هر روز به من و دوستانم می دهید.همیشه شاد باشید.

SERENDIP said...

Nazy jan: I concur with Mana. Though, I wish I could share your optimism, I really wish I could.

Nazy said...

Salam Alef Shin Jan: Thanks for the lead. Though I had seen the link in several link rolls, I had never been to visit this blog. She is an amazing young woman. I will have to go back and look more carefully later. Thanks.

Nazy said...

My Dear Mana: Don't mention it. I have sought and found you with my heart. You all make me so proud.

Nazy said...

Wonderful Serendip: I have a very old friend who always likes to remind me that there are two types of people in this world: Optimists and realists! He considers me of the first group and himself of the second, and for the past 20 years we have continually teased each other about it. We are all here, doing the business of life, Serendip. What other choice do we have but to accept our mission with optimism and hope? Would it reduce the plights of this world if we, as the only bright spots of belief in our power to change things, would also succumb to the darkness and fall quiet? Who will save us, our children, and those we love and care about? We have to keep at it, doggedly and with determination. Don't be mistaken my friend--there continue to be times when I, too, would rather wallow in my sadness and desperation, and give up. But then what? When we live with hope, at least our existence is less pained and our movements less restricted. You are the one who always tells me there is so much beauty in this world for those who have the eye to see it (Iranians call it "chashme basirat"). Look at it this way, those babies are born to those mothers, and they will continue to live and lead their lives, whether or not you and I have any optimism or attention to their growth and development. If we can pay responsible attention to all those whose lives we can touch, and have goodwill and hope and optimism for them, helping them feel loved and cherished, there is a better chance that they will turn into more responsible, loving adults. Don't you think this world has suffered enough in the hands of the ignorant, the unthinking, the unloved, and the unloving? This might be where we can make a difference, albeit a tiny dent in a huge, dense mass. The next person trying to make a dent will achieve more profound results than we did, and by the time groups and nations try to make those dents, the effect will be profound. Of course, I say all of this to you, a most refined, intelligent, and loving individual yourself. This is the day for me to say these words to you, and another day, when I'm down and low on energy nd hope, you will come along and prop me up! That's the beauty of the fascinating game called life, spiced with caring and compassion. Be good my beautiful friend. Don't ever give up.

nimshab said...

Nazy joon it was an honor to be mentioned in the scripts of your blog. Your post is full of brightness and I hope as you said every thing turns out well with the future world. I read Mana's blog and really liked her, reminded me of my dear cousin in Tehran. And A.Sh. is also really fascinating, especially since she is also an engineer ;)

Nazy said...

Salam Nimeh Shab Jan: The honor is all mine azizam. I'm glad you went to visit Mana's and Mrs. Shin's blogs. They are very refreshing. Don't forget to look at Alef Shin's recommended blog, too. (I should tell you that Alef Shin is not the same as Mrs. Shin. His blog is http://dialogos.blogfa.com/). Be good.

serendip said...

Nazy jan: Thank you for setting me straight. I needed that. Right after I left that comment, I felt sort of guilty, not considering the young moms but then I knew somehow you'll rescue me...LOL

The world needs more optimists like you and less realists like me.

Nazy said...

Wise Serendip: The world needs YOU! And no rescue intended! Remember the days I wrote to you, asking for your help which you so generously and immediately gave? I do. You are one of a kind my friend, never fitting into any of the ordinary matrices we tend to define.

All evening I have been working on a story. I write and write and it doesn't even get close to the point where I can usually run with it. Uphill, heavy, and slow, has been my progress. Like a child trying to find any diversion to stop work, I run to check comments and go visit other blogs, procrastinating my work. How embarrassing for a grown (very) woman! Thanks for the diversion and be good my friend.

programmer craig said...

Nazy, "optimists" usually annoy the hell out of me, but I love reading your words. Very uplifting. I wish all optimists were like you, maybe I'd convert :)

Nazy said...

Pro Craig! How good of you to come back! Another tough realist! What can I say? You guys need to keep us in check so we won't get too carried away, and we will occasionally come along and tickle the more fanciful side of you guys! Is it a deal?

programmer craig said...

Is it a deal?

You bet! :)

Assal said...

While reading your comment to Serendip and your post itself, I was reminded that I too am an optimist at heart. Sometimes amid the little boring tasks that we repeat day to day, we forget how much hope we have inside us and how optimistically we used to think about the future.

Although I might be younger, I feel it so necessary to be reminded in every way possible never to forget that sense of optimism---because while those little child's painted hands are a sign of a bright future for Iran, so is your thoughtful blog, and the art of the dancers you introduce us to on Fridays, and so on. All our attempts at being good, thoughtful, progess-minded people are a sign of optimism. Thanks for being the best kind of reminder as to what is important, Nazy Joonam. I needed that.

Nazy said...

Lovely Assal. Thank you.