8/12/2007

What Heaven Must Sound Like Right Now

Watch Ostad Bikchekhani on Tar and Otsad Farnam on Dayereh play live at Hafezieh in Shiraz in the early 1970's. I had never seen the Dayereh played like that! Listen to the masters and enjoy. The two of them and Hafez are probably making Heaven sound and feel beautiful right now!

11 comments:

Ehsan said...

What a nice title for this post dear Nazi.
And what a great oportunity it was to finally get to meet you yesterday.
Now, while you are enjoying yourself in Alephnull's concert tonight, I am obsessively reading about the mathematical definition of Alephnull and Aleph numbers on the web. Have fun.

ا. ش said...

ممنون از این که چنین گذشته‌ی زیبایی را با ما بخش می‌کنید. گویی آوازی از کائنات در دل ما طنین انداز شده

Anonymous said...

It is great nazy jan even after more than 35 years, and as you said, the unique style of playing Dayerh,
thanks
bayram

Pardis said...

Nazy jan,

Thanks for the video. That was great. I listened to that several times. There is always something new in your blog and I love each and every one of them. Your blog is the best.

Best wishes for you,
Pardis

Nazy said...

Ehsan Jan: How delightful to have met you! Thanks for coming to visit. I'm glad you know what the mathematical Alephnull is! Better you than me my dear! I will stick with subjects and disciplines I can understand better. Be good and have a good week Ehsan Jan.

Nazy said...

Alef Shin Jan: How are you? You disappeared there for a while! Did you notice how sweet that Tar sounded? Priceless. Be good Alef Shin.

Nazy said...

Salam Bar Bayram Jan: I have seen great artistry in playing the Daf during recent years. I have seen physically fit Daf players throw it in the air to flip and to twirl it and such. I had never seen it done with the Dayereh.

Of course, Dayereh is such an "under-stated" musical instrument in classical Iranian music presentations. I know it is a prominent instrument in Azari music. I also observed in Ghooniyeh that the Daf was played very much like a dayereh, lacking the beat and theatrics of the way Iranians play the Daf.

(Speaking of Azari music, Bayram, you really must pick up playing the Garman again. It will be fabulous!)

It was a joy to watch this clip for more than one reason. Be good Bayram Jan. I hope you have a good time during your travels.

Nazy said...

Pardis-e-Azizam: Thank you for coming back and thanks for leaving that kind comment. Yes, I watched that clip myself several times, too! There is something really perfect about everything in it, the music, the master musicians, the stage, the audience, everything about it is so perfect to watch. It is a gem. Have a good week my friend.

shobeir said...

btw In the recent concert of Master shajarian, the was a man play Daf and dayere, I guess Daf gives volume to persian music...

Nazy said...

Salam Shobeir Jan. What you say is true. I have also attended concerts in which other percussion instruments have been used to augment the music. For example in Parisa's recent concert I saw Behnam Samani (of Dastan ensemble) play the koozeh, original inspiration about which I understand came from a foreign instrument (African?) and was modified for use in Iranian music. Though I find the Daf very exciting to hear, I still think the ultimate percussion for Iranian music to be Tombak.

Be good Shobeir Jan.

serendip said...

Excellent. It almost sounds like the music from Akira Kurosawa movies.