11/28/2007

Inspired on A Wednesday (Part II)

While on the subject of inspired and inspiring paintings, I would like to make sure you have all heard the story of a Mazandarani woman by the name of Mokarrameh. Have you heard it? It is an incredible story, which my friend Alef Shin shared with me not too long ago.
A very young village girl was married to a much older man about 60 years ago. The young girl was deeply sad and unhappy, looking for an outlet to release the pain and abuse she had suffered in her world in Darikandeh Village of Babol. Later in her life she became attached to her pet cow. When she was too old to take her cow grazing, her children secretly sold the cow. Mokarrameh went through a depression after which she started painting. At first she was painting with raspberry juice. She then started finding paper and paint, painting more elaborate and sophisticated designs. She painted day and night, giving her paintings away. When she ran out of paper, she would paint on her walls and furniture and appliances. When asked why she painted, she responded that she had so much to say, but she was illiterate and couldn’t read or write, so she started to paint to express herself, her hopes, her fears, and her demons.
Mokarrameh started a revolution in her village, where slowly other village people started painting, too. She started having visitors from Tehran , mostly artists and fellow painters. She received national and international attention until in 2001 she was named Woman of The Year in Sweden. Mokarrameh died in 2005, leaving a legacy of love for painting and hope in her village and in every Iranian's heart. Each year artists from all over Iran gather in her village to remember her. On that day everybody paints in her memory. Take a look at this slideshow on BBC Persian about this year's event. You can read more about her here. Doesn't this story just inspire you?

8 comments:

Mitra said...

What a truly amazing story! I think the best part of her story is to have awakened the people in her village to a world of possibilities, different from what they may have ever known. Beautiful.

Azar Rasti said...

I found your weblog's address through a comment you left on Iranian. I spent some time looking around here and this is so nice. I loved Mokarame's story. She was so strong. Thank you for sharing.

Roya said...

The part of the story about the cow reminds me of Hasani and the Magic Bean. He had a cow named Khanoom Hana. I remember that the song he sang for his cow when it was sold was the only thing that made me cry for a long time.

Nazy said...

Mitra Jan:

Are you Mitra from New York, the one that loved Pirashki Khosravi? Welcome back my friend. Yes, that is a very important aspect of Mokarrameh's story in my opinion, too. Be good azizam and come back soon.

Nazy said...

Azar Jan:

I am honored you came and you took the trouble to read and to leave a comment. Yes, Mokarrameh was strong in the face of her adversities. We must learn from that. I loved how in the slideshow, there are pictures of everyone painting in her memory. Very poignant. Thanks again.

Nazy said...

Roya Jan, thanks for reminding me of that story. Is it just me or are many Iranian children's tales sad stories? Khaleh Sooskeh comes to mind at this time! Be good azizam.

masoud said...

سلام.اطمینانت بجا بود.منهم سرگذشت مکرمه راشنیده بودم،اما متاسفانه پس از درگذشت او.نمونه سخت کوشی و امید و خلاقیت است.ای کاش در زمان حیاتش اینگونه معرفی میشد.راستی جالب است که یک "راستی" دیگر هم به گروه دوستان پیوسته است.خیر مقدم.

Nazy said...

Dear Massoud:

Yes, another "Rasti" has been a welcome arrival!

Too many times we remember people only after they are gone. Though in Mokarrameh's case, it appears that she did spend her last years knowing that others were inspired by her. God bless her soul. Have a nice day Massoud Jan.